Books I read in December 2021

This month has been an odd mixture. I finally finished Mighty Stories, Dangerous Rituals, which I started in November. And I read Rewards and Fairies which is quite a melancholy book. I also finally got hold of The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows in book form, for which I’ve been waiting for a long time, but it’s more of a dipping book. I read Esmond in India and found it a bit depressing. Then I read a collection of interviews with Ursula K Le Guin.

Continue reading

Everything you think you know about Wicca is wrong

This blogpost was inspired by this conversation on Twitter:

The snark quotient of this post may be dangerously high — you’re strongly advised to put your snark goggles on, because I have a snark hammer and I am not afraid to use it.

Continue reading

Notable and quotable 22

This week’s absolute belter of a post was Christopher Penczak’s article Holding the door open.

Don’t miss Julian Vayne’s series of interviews, Our Magical Things.

And a lovely post on egg healing in Slavic magic on the Divine Multiplicity blog.

Really great post on being in mythological time from Kiya Nicoll (how was I not following Kiya’s blog before now?)

And a guest post by Ing Venning on Nimue Brown’s blog.

Continue reading

Follow Friday

Just been having a conversation with someone I’m following about how to find good blogs to follow on WordPress.

I don’t use the search function very often. I have found the occasional good stuff via search, but it is rare.

Instead, I follow the blogs of people who write good comments on blogs I’m already following. Or people I find on Twitter or Instagram who share an interesting article. Or people I know from other contexts.

I have also followed a lot of people whose posts are featured in The River Crow’s excellent series, Friday Foraging.

In this post, I am going to share a list of the people whose blogs I am following on WordPress. (The title is from #FollowFriday on Twitter)

Continue reading

What we have in common

I dreamed that I was in an Anglican or Episcopalian Church in North America and had been invited by the vicar to introduce a hymn. She handed me the order of service which already had a hymn picked out, and it had been annotated to change “him” to “her”, so I introduced it and encouraged people to sing “her” where appropriate if they wanted to. One of the congregation said they didn’t really know the tune for that hymn. So then I suggested we sang Morning has broken and changed “him” to “her” in the second verse, and “God’s” to “Her” in the third verse. Then I woke up.

Continue reading